Something that I think bears repeating.

Rangewriter

As early as 1939, Nazis began arresting teachers, civil servants, artists, priests, politicians, representatives of the intellectual elite, and members of the numerous resistance organizations that were springing up in Germany and Poland. Sometimes these victims were simply shot on the spot. Others were arrested and sent to concentration camps for trivial offenses—like failing to sing the pledge of allegiance with enough enthusiasm.

Before Auschwitz was built, Poles were expelled from a large region west of Krakow. By 1941, all residents were gone and their homes had been demolished.

Auschwitz I, located near the former village of Oświęcim, was an SS garrison and the seat of the main offices of political and prison labor departments. The main military supply stores and workshops were located there. Political prisoners began arriving in 1940.Auschwitz II-Birkenau, built in 1942 on the site of the former village of Brzenka, was originally intended to…

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4 thoughts on “Part Two: Can we learn from history? Perhaps the question is what can we learn from history? Or why don’t we learn from history?

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